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Fit for 55 – EU recognises the need for a broad alternative fuels infrastructure across Europe

02 September 2021 | Europe
Legal Briefings

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In the context of the ‘fit for 55’ package, published on 14 July 2021, the European Commission proposed the adoption of a new Regulation for the deployment of an alternative fuels infrastructure; the new Regulation will repeal Directive 2014/94/EU (DAFI).

The initiative seeks to ensure the availability and usability of a dense, widespread network of alternative fuels infrastructure throughout the European Union (EU), with the aim that all users of alternative fuel vehicles (including vessels and aircraft) will be able to move through the EU with ease, enabled by key infrastructure such as motorways, ports and airports. The specific objectives of the proposed Regulation are to: (i) ensure minimum infrastructure to support the required uptake of alternative fuel vehicles across all transport modes and in all EU Member States to meet the EU’s climate objectives; (ii) ensure full interoperability of the infrastructure; and (iii) ensure comprehensive user information and adequate payment options.

Background

The Commission's proposal represents a recognition that mobility brings many socio-economic benefits to the European public and to European businesses, and also has a growing impact on the environment, including in the form of increased greenhouse gas emissions and local air pollution, and that the EU is still missing a complete network of alternative fuels infrastructure.

The Commission carried out an ex post evaluation of the DAFI, which found that it is not sufficient for the purpose of reaching the EU's increased climate targets for 2030. The main issues include that Member States’ infrastructure planning often lacks the necessary level of ambition, consistency and coherence, leading to insufficient and not-well distributed infrastructure. Further interoperability issues with physical connections persist, while new issues have emerged over communication standards, including data exchange among the different actors in the electro-mobility ecosystem. Additionally, there is a lack of transparent consumer information and common payment systems, which limits user acceptance. Without further action by EU institutions, this lack of interoperability and easy-to use recharging and refuelling infrastructure is likely to become a barrier to growth in the use of low and zero-emission vehicles, vessels and, in the future, aircraft.

By ensuring that the necessary infrastructure for zero and low-emission vehicles and vessels is in place, this initiative will complement a set of other policy initiatives under the 'fit for 55' package that stimulate demand for such vehicles by setting price signals that incorporate the climate and environmental externalities of fossil fuels; such initiatives include the revision of the Emissions Trading System (Directive 2003/87/EC), and the revision of the EU Energy Taxation Directive (Directive 2003/96/EC).

Key provisions

Simplification

The review of DAFI increases the overall policy ambition and also includes some important simplification aspects, which primarily affects charge point operators and mobility service providers. The setting of clear and common minimum requirements aims to align business operations, as businesses will face similar minimum requirements in all Member States, and the new requirements will simplify the use of the infrastructure by private and corporate consumers (who currently face a plethora of use approaches) and enable better business service innovation. With these proposed changes, consumer trust in the robustness of a pan-European network of recharging and refuelling infrastructure may increase and thereby support the overall profitability of recharging and refuelling points, and support a stable business case. It is aimed that all market actors and user groups will benefit from lower information costs and, in the case of market actors, lower legal compliance costs in the medium term, as the requirements for infrastructure provisioning under the proposed Regulation will be better harmonised. Public authorities may also benefit from a coherent EU-wide framework that is aimed at making coordination with public and private market actors easier.

Coverage of publicly accessible recharging points

The proposal sets out specific provisions for the rollout of certain recharging and refuelling infrastructure for light- and heavy-duty road transport vehicles, vessels and aircraft.

Road transport

Member States are required to ensure minimum coverage of publicly accessible recharging points dedicated to light- and heavy-duty road transport vehicles on their territory, including on the TEN-T core and comprehensive network. In particular, Member States must install charging and fuelling points at regular intervals on major highways, at every 60 kilometres for electric charging and every 150 kilometres for hydrogen refuelling.

Further provisions are introduced to ensure the user-friendliness of the recharging infrastructure. These include provisions on payment options, price transparency and consumer information, non-discriminatory practices, smart recharging, and signposting rules for electricity supply to recharging points.

Member States are also required to ensure until 1 January 2025 minimum coverage of publicly accessible refuelling points for liquefied natural gas (LNG) dedicated to heavy-duty vehicles on the TEN-T core and comprehensive network.

Vessels

Member States must ensure installation of a minimum shore-side electricity supply for certain seagoing ships in maritime ports and for inland waterway vessels. The proposal also defines the criteria for exempting certain ports and sets requirements to ensure a minimum shore-side electricity supply.

Member States are also required to ensure an appropriate number of LNG refuelling points in maritime TEN-T ports and to identify relevant ports through their national policy frameworks.

Aircraft

The proposed Regulation sets out minimum provisions for electricity supply to all stationary aircraft in TEN-T core and comprehensive network airports.

Provisions for Member States’ national policy frameworks

The provisions for Member States’ national policy frameworks are reformulated under the proposal, which makes provision for an iterative process between Member States and the Commission to develop concise planning to deploy infrastructure and meet the targets as provided in the proposed Regulation. It also includes new provisions on formulating a strategy for the deployment of alternative fuels in other modes of transport together with key sectoral and regional/local stakeholders. This would apply where the Regulation does not set mandatory requirements but where emerging policy requirements connected to the development of alternative fuel technologies need to be considered.

The approach to governance includes reporting obligations corresponding to provisions for Member States on national policy frameworks, and national progress reports in an interactive process with the Commission. It also sets requirements for the Commission to report on Member States’ national policy frameworks and progress reports.

Data provision requirements

Data provision requirements are set out for operators or owners of publicly accessible recharging or refuelling points on the availability and accessibility of certain static and dynamic data types, including the establishing of an identification registration organisation (IDRO) for the issuing of identification (ID) codes. Under this provision, the Commission is also empowered to adopt further delegated acts to specify further elements as required.

Common technical specifications

The existing common technical specifications are integrated with a set of new areas for which the Commission will be entitled to adopt new delegated acts. These will build on, as deemed necessary,  standards developed by the European standardisation organisations (ESOs).

The proposal also includes detailed provisions on national reporting by Member States to support the implementation of the Regulation, and common technical specifications or areas where delegated acts will need to be adopted to define common technical specifications.

More on the Fit for 55 suite of proposals

For more, see also our Decarbonisation Hub where you can also access our full series of posts – Fit for 55: A greener transition for Europe.

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